The Finer Things In Life: Where To Go To Experience The Best Vineyards In The World

There’s a saying in Italy that years, lovers and glasses of wine should never be counted. The saying is a testament to how much wine is esteemed in cultures that grow up around it. Producing fine wine is no mean task: the grapes have to be planted in the right soil, ripened to just the right amount, plucked at the right time, squeezed, pulped and the juice fermented and then stored for the right number of years. No travel experience is complete without a visit to a truly great vineyard and winery so here is a list of the best wine production countries and their regions:

Bienvenue en France

France is the most famous wine producing country in the whole world and also has the highest volume of production. Fun fact: although bubbly is called ‘champagne’ casually by everyone, only the effervescent, clear wine produced in the Champagne region of France is actually allowed to be marketed as champagne; other champagne- like drinks should be sold under the label “sparkling wine.” There are famous chateaux in France that cater to guests who wish to make visits to the more celebrated vineyards in regions like Bordeaux, Champagne, Cȏte du Rhone and Burgundy

Bienvenido an España

Spain is also a country famous for its distinctive full- flavoured wines. You can take a wine tour in Spain via the rail as Spain is a large country and the vineyards are far apart. Areas like Navarra, Priorat, Rioja, Rias Baixas, Ribera del Duero, and Rueda produce two types of wine: Quality Wines Produced in a Specific region (QWPSR) and Vino de Mesa or Table Wine which is a more domestic and commercial sort of wine.

Many experts believe that sherry, the unusual tasting wine, originated with Phoenicians who colonized and settled in the Iberian peninsula of Spain; a wine tour in Spain will steep you in the wine history of Europe.

Benvenuto in Italia

Italy has a long history of making wine, from the time of the Roman Empire. There are 15 different wine producing regions in the country; coincidentally, there are also 15 administrative districts in Italy. This is because making wine isn’t limited to certain areas in Italy. Each region has its own wine, flavoured by its local culture. The more famous wine regions include Lombardy, Tuscany, Sicily, Puglia, Veneto and Campania among others. Italian wines are divided into two: rosso (red) and bianco (white) which have further varieties like arneis, pecorino and pinot grigio in white wine and aglianico, dolceto and sangiovese in red.